Mar 31 2005

rest in peace

Rest in peace dear Terri Schavio, may God be with you.


Mar 29 2005

now where did I leave my competency?

Man, even with 3 years of working with CSS and HTML these last few weeks have been making me feel quite incompetent with both. I am working on a new layout, that *hopefully* will be finished to be released on April 1st, but it seems that as soon as I get the formating right to make an item appear how I want it to, it screws up another piece of my page. . . it is driving me crazy, I really can’t wait to get all of the glitches worked out, and get it posted cause it rocks!


Mar 28 2005

saving terri?

With the recent controversy over the Terri Schiavo suit, I thought that I would spread a little bit of my two cents on this case.According to Pia, has Terri has been placed on morphine, not because she?s feeling pain-if she is its vestige?but I truly doubt that she?s feeling any. She?s on morphine to make her parents and siblings feel better, and I?m for anything that will help them get through this. Where she is also being given ice chips and her lips and mouth are constantly being moistened. If she can feel this will make her comfortable.

Terri’s Condition

Doctors that Michael Schiavo hired have said she is in a persistent vegetative state. That does not mean she is brain dead. People in a persistent vegetative state cannot think, speak or respond to commands and are not aware of their surroundings. They may have noncognitive functions and breathing and circulation may remain relatively intact. Terry Schiavo breathes on her own and blinks.

In this case, Terri is already dead, she is only alive in the physical sense, whereas emotionally, and psychologically she died fifteen years ago. Honestly I don?t know what Terri Schiavo wanted, no one does. But fifteen years is too long to live in a state of suspended life?life with only a brain stem working is no life at all.

Personally, I don?t know exactly where I stand on this issue, for to much of the “evidence” that has been presented has been clouded and muddled so that the truth has been blurred to mean what people want it to mean. And I personally do not like to take a stand for a specific side on an issue that I do not have the proper amount of evidence to support each side?s ideas; but here I am at an impasse. I do not believe fully that either way was the correct path to take, I believe that there is a third choice that could have been made in this case but no one wanted to see it. (*I know I am being severely vague here*)

If I was in her condition I would not want to live, yet I would not want to die this way either, whether or not she can feel pain from the dehydration and starvation. Thankfully I have not had to go through any of the pain that her family is going through right now, but I really just want her to be at peace.

For those who base your belief off of medical standards;
If the 97% of doctors are correct and she is really just a vegetable that has absolutely no chance of any cognitive repair. Then Terri is merely existing for her family?s comfort. And for there belief in modern day miracles based on empty dreams.

But if the 3% of doctors are correct that say that she is capable of cognitive regeneration and that she actually can feel, and is aware of the world around her. But is just incapable of expressing it in any outward motor function. I would want to die; being trapped within a prison of my own body, is no way to live.

For those who base your belief off of religious standards;
First, if you believe that good Christians go to heaven upon death to join God and the angels, then why are you fighting Terri so hard against Terri’s journey there? If it’s such a great place, why are you fighting tooth and nail to keep Terri in her corporeal form down here on earth where she has slim to no chance of actually developing brain function? All I know is if there’s a real choice between heaven and being imprisoned in an ethereal form over which one barely has control, I would choose heaven. And I would sure as heck resent anyone who grabbed my arm and held me back from running there as fast as I could.

Second, if you argue that keeping Terri alive is The Will of God, have you stopped to consider who caused the heart attack that put Terri in this position to begin with? Perhaps God was trying to take her back into His fold, and now our mortal feeding tube is what’s actually thwarting God’s plan. Since none of can ever actually speak to God to determine His intentions, we’re all just guessing here. So how can you be so freaking sure that you aren’t the one thwarting God’s intentions? Who’s the one “playing God” now?

And, I know that I just contradicted myself multiple times in here, but I seriously think that this is a purely conditional case, depending on whether she is at all cognizant or not, is what is the table turner for me. I just wish that there was another way that this could be done. And I really, truly wish that she passes soon, to help this all end, and let her truly be at peace. The sooner that she dies the sooner that this masquerade of protesters for both sides will diminish, and her family will be a little more at peace.
*UPDATE- Thank you to Kines for figuring out the problem with my meta tags, and making everything pretty again!


Mar 28 2005

movie quote monday

There’s a time when you can share and you hold hands and be on the same path. But there’s always a fork in the road… at some point. And sometimes you have to go on one part of the fork and they gotta go on the other part of the fork. Or just down the back part of the fork while you go forward. And they’re like *sigh* Or they got a salad fork and you have one of the big dinner forks and you have longer to go but they’re like done because that’s it, they’re stuck on a piece of food, that they *sigh*. A desert fork or like one of those, you know small little shrimp forks or crab forks and you’re trying to get out a crab. They’re like that and you’re over here jumping to the huge serving fork or something like that, or a ladle, you know.
– Alan Tudyk as Gerhardt in 28 Days


Mar 27 2005

Finding Neverland

Director: Marc Forster
Starring: Johnny Depp, Kate Winslet, Radha Mitchell, Julie Christie, Freddie Highmore
Rated: PG
Runtime: 103 minutes

Finding Neverland is an in-depth visual walk through J.M. Barrie’s experience in writing his hit play “Peter Pan”. Set in London in 1904, the film follows J.M. Barrie’s creative journey to bring Peter Pan to life, from his first inspiration for the story up until the play’s premiere.

At one point in “Finding Neverland,” J.M. Barrie (played by Johnny Depp) and his distant wife Mary (Radha Mitchell) retire to their separate bedrooms – but while she enters a dark room, the door to his room opens to reveal a fantasy landscape of blue sky and trees. This single flawless scene crystallizes everything this magical movie is about: how a creative artist channeled his personal pain through his imagination to bring forth one of literature’s most timeless classics.

J.M. Barrie (played by Johnny Depp) is a playwright who is dealing with the fading of his stardom and the flop of his most recent play, as he is attempting to write a new screenplay, he is inspired by a sick, single mother; Silvia Davies (Kate Winslet) and her four boys; Peter, George, Jack and Michael. As he watches them at play, a kind of spiritual hunger begins to glow in his eyes. They represent an innocence and purity that strikes him so powerfully he’s unable to think of anything else. Barrie soon befriends Sylvia and the boys, especially the 12-year-old Peter (Freddie Highmore), still grieving for his father by being too serious for play and imagination.

Barrie is instantly drawn to the impressionable children, and performs an impromptu play for the abiding family. An instant bond is formed, and Barrie and the Davies family quickly become inseparable. The Davie’s children instantly become his muse in writing his new script, which he names after Peter, the second youngest and most emotionally grieved from the loss of their father. Their friendship causes problems with his wife and the snooty society types, but Barrie’s whimsical playdates with the boys lay the groundwork for the successful stage production about a boy who refuses to grow up. It becomes increasingly clear through the interaction between the five, that Sylvia is Barrie’s true soul mate and muse, so it’s especially wrenching when her uncontrollable coughs signal fresh tragedy for him and the Davies boys.

Perhaps what hit me most is how when Barrie was with the boys, he was able to take them out of the world, and the pain that they lived in, and experience a world that was beyond their wildest imaginations. It saddened me that as he played with these children, their mother sat, silently falling for the man that possibly was the one thing that kept her alive for as long as she had. Possibly the most tear wrenching climactic part of the film was within the last ten minutes, right after the premiere of the play, when a more intimate version is staged for the dying Sylvia and her boys, within the security of their own living room.

At its heart, this movie is about believing and finding happiness and that just because someone has left you, they are not really lost forever, but they are always with you. That we all have a piece of Neverland inside of us, and all we have to do is to believe that it is there, and we can go anytime.